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Where does WinSCP store site's information or password? I can't find it under Documents and Settings...

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I know this solution will be too easy for superusers ;) but if you don't want to get hands dirty or just need to see passwords asap, imho good option is to use smartftp's additional tool password recovery. i don't want to advertise or something, but for me it was really useful utility. btw here is quick tut how to see those passwords: digitalette.com/web/recover-lost-ftp-passwords-winscp hope i helped –  flasherr May 3 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The configuration file is stored either in the Windows registry or, if you are using the portable version, in an INI file. (See the documentation.) The registry location is:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Martin Prikryl\WinSCP 2

You can always export the settings to an INI file by pressing Export in the preferences dialog.

Note that your passwords are not stored in text, but encoded. Though difficult to decrypt, it is not impossible.

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1  
In WinSCP 5.2.x and later the export function has been moved to Tools > Export/Backup Configuration on Login dialog. –  Martin Prikryl Nov 21 '13 at 7:35

You could use a tool like WireShark to "see" what goes on over the wire. What I mean is to have a packet capturing session running (in WireShark) and then login to your FTP server (using WinSCP, with NO encryption).

Then, by looking at the registered session in WireShark, one could easily identify the "discussion" (filtering by the destination IP for example) and then identifying the Request: USER blabla, and then REQUEST: PASS blabla, at the FTP level of the "conversation".

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Create a new C# console application, then type the following program:

namespace ConsoleApplication8
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            foreach (var str in args)
                System.Console.WriteLine(str);
            System.Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

If you are not a C# programmer, you can do as easily on any other language you might be familiar with. The point is simply to print whatever values are passed as an argument to your program. You can even do it with a script, if that is more familiar to you.

Now, compile your program, and grab your binary (such as ConsoleApplication8.exe). Place it on a suitable place, such as your desktop.

Now, if your password still works, fire up WinSCP and connect to your site. Click on Options -> Preferences

enter image description here

On the Preferences dialog, go to Integration -> Applications. Replace what was previously in the PuTTY path with the path to your newly created binary. Also select the option "Remember session password and pass it to PuTTY (SSH)".

enter image description here

Click OK, and then try to launch PuTTY from within WinSCP.

Your previously stored password should now be visible in your screen.

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1  
That's pretty clever! –  Paul Lammertsma Feb 4 at 15:29

I came to this answer while researching a slightly different problem however this was helpful and I wanted to share what I did.

My problem was that I was using WinSCP with passwords saved under Windows XP within an Active Directory domain which then changed. With the new Active Directory domain, my user profile also changed resulting in WinSCP showing no saved logon profiles.

In order to recover the previous WinSCP logon profiles I did the following.

Started up the regedit application and did a search for any keys that had a name of Martin Prikryl. After several false matches, I found the key with what looked to be the correct session data.

I then exported the WinSCP Session registry key using the regedit export command into a text file.

Next I modified the exported text in the text file so that it used HKEY_CURRENT_USER as the beginning of the complete key in front of the Software sub-key

Next using regedit, I imported the data to modify the Windows Registry keys used by WinSCP for the current user.

These actions did the following: (1) found the WinSCP logon Session data for the old user profile, (2) made a copy of that data, (3) modified the Windows Registry key to allow an import with regedit to modify the current user, (4) imported the data modifying the WinSCP registry entries for the current user profile.

After doing this procedure I was able to access my web server with WinSCP.

There are probably a couple of reasons why this was straightforward and worked. First of all this PC was used only by one person so was not shared reducing the false matches. Secondly I had Administrator privileges to the PC. Third this was Windows XP and not Windows 7/8.

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