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I want one of those to write my blog articles with. I'm tired of manually converting breaks from rough notes to either paragraphs or line breaks for release as HTML, and tired of converting spaces to breaking or non-breaking ones. There are standard Unicode code points for the difference - what editor lets me use almost plain ASCII text but with builtin support and understanding for Unicode paragraph and non-breaking space characters?

And ideally will let me save straight to either plain text UTF8 or to a file of plain HTML paragraphs?

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I think Notepad++ can accomplish this. There are options to encode and convert to several different formats under the aptly named "Format" drop down on the menu bar.

http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm

This is a great text editor to have.

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Just downloaded it.. Sadly it doesn't make head nor tail of Unicode code point 2029 (paragraph marker). But it looks to be a great editor otherwise. –  martinr Jan 31 '10 at 21:51
    
Practically no one supports U+2028 and U+2029, and it's no wonder. The visual-metaphor convention (one newline equals a line break, two or more equal a paragraph break) still works fine. –  Alan M Feb 1 '10 at 0:48
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I just found these shortcut keys in the OpenOffice word processor:

  • Shift+Enter - Enter line break (as opposed to paragraph marker)
  • Ctrl+Shift+Space - Enter non-breaking space (note OO wiki page I read says Ctrl+Space which doesn't work)

This makes my life a bit easier. Now I can mark out what is code and what is not much more easily. The Save As HTML output is closer to the final result I want for my blog. I'll scrap the raw UTF-8 files idea. It looks to be a bridge too far.

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