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I just recently experienced problem with my Photoshop, It seem that it is slowing down when I am doing graphics design. Big or small files ( from 20 x 20 inch 300 dpi of resolution to 800x600 72 resolution ) it is really slowing down. Particularly when I am panning to my project It just get stuck for a few seconds then back to normal with slow movement. Can you guess what's wrong?

I have an updated antivirus and I don't think virus is causing it. other adobe suite is working fine just my photoshop. I am running in windows 7, using Intel Core2 Duo 2.40 Ghz and has an Installed Ram of 2 GB. My primary scratch disk has 21 Gigabyte left and the secondary has a 13.89 GB. I need a solution urgently. I am planning to reformat my computer just to resolve my problem.

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Scratch disk? There's your problem right there. –  Hello71 Jul 18 '10 at 21:38
    
2GB of RAM? There's your problem right there. –  mtone Feb 3 '13 at 2:09

4 Answers 4

Check your performance settings, especially your cache levels and memory usage.

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There are a number of performance options in Photoshop which you can troubleshoot. They are all listed and detailed in this article. The Mac version is here.

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It's actually a very simple answer -- a 20"x20" sized piece with high dpi settings will always slow down your photoshop. When I do these sized pieces I will create them in half settings meaning make it 10" x 10" with 300 dpi. Then when you are finished with the PSD file save as it is -- when they are the layered files be sure to save them as such PSD --- So for example:

Your working PSD file should actually be from the beginning: 10 Width 10 Height 300 DPI Depending on if you are going to be printing this work OR it is for Web will determine if you need to have it in RGB or CMYK. I will assume this is for Print work.

Save your progress as you work --- Be sure to save as (EXAMPLE: FILENAME A_PSD CMYK FULL.PSD)

When you are totally completed with your FULL file then move on to your PRINT file...

With your working file still open create a flat layer by going to the top most layer and CTRL + ALT + SHIFT + E ---- This will create a FLAT Layer at the top most in your layers palette. Then with the selection being this flat layer Select All by hitting the CTRL + A keys at the same time -- this will copy the layer then type CTRL + N , this will create a new open file - once it opens up after you confirm the settings which should be the same as above 10 W x 10 H (both in inches) and 300 dpi, click CTRL + V .... this will paste the layer that you just copied into the new file. Then use CTRL + E and this will flatten the layers down into one layer. Then save your file (Example: Filename A_JPG FLAT CMYK.JPG).

Once you have saved the file w/ the flattened layer you can now exit out of your FULL working file as you will now be working with the flattened piece that will be ready for publish (print, web, etc). Here is where you can now size it up. Keep in mind most printshops now have photoshop people working in the office to work with orders. Some can be very snooty about sizing the work back up. If you have one of these printers this is when you will want to size your work back up to the 20"x20" piece and then save. Then you are ready to send it off to the printer. If your printer is one that you can send the half size be sure to mention this when you are sending over the 1/2 sized piece so they can size it back up to where it belongs.

Hope this makes sense! Best of Luck!!

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Thanks for sharing your experience. In your advice process in creating another file for the flattened version. An alternative way of doing it is Image > Duplicate (instead of copy and paste process), then I think an action can be recorded so it can be reuse :) Thanks again –  Pennf0lio Feb 4 '13 at 17:02

Have you done any troubleshooting out side of PS? For instance, you can right-click the Windows Task bar and select "Task Manager". Sort the Task list by CPU and then watch which programs bubble up to the top of that list as you work in PS. It may be that something outside PS is slowing your PC down. Try that and let us know which programs are using most of your CPU when you see the PC slow down.

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Yes, I tried monitoring my task manager, I also tried using photoshop without other application running. But it still is slowing down. After I open my Photoshop in few minutes it gradually slows down. Slowing down is very noticeable when I zoom or either pan to my project. this is my first time to experience this kind of slowing down. Before I had used photshop together with other large applications, illustrator, mozilla, media player and didn't experience this kind of slowing down. –  Pennf0lio Feb 1 '10 at 15:11

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