Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I turned my PC on this morning to discover it complaining about being unable to start up. It goes through the repair process and prompts me to do a system restore, saying that it will not affect my personal files. I accept and finally manage to boot and login to windows only to discover that all the code I wrote yesterday afternoon had been rolled back as well (the last backup to server was in the morning).

The system restore tool in windows says that the process is reversible, but I can't see any way of doing this. On the list of available restore points there is monday (the one it restored to) and a few others, but no sign of any undo button or a restore point from where it was this morning.

Am I missing an obvious way to do this or am I doomed to rewrite yesterdays work?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You would have to make a restore point at the moment before restoring and restore "back to the future"

Edit: Apperently this is always done ;-)

System Restore lets you easily restore your computer to a previous state. What happens if you complete the restore process but your computer is still not running properly? It is possible that you unintentionally restored Windows 7 using the wrong restore point. In such cases, you can undo a system restore operation and select a different restore point.

To undo a system restore operation in Windows 7:

  • Click Start and type System Restore in the search box. From the list of results, click System Restore.
  • Click Undo my last restoration and click Next.
  • Review your choices and click Finish.
  • Your computer will restart once the process is complete. Log on to the computer.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but there is no option to 'Undor my last restoration'. From the page you linked: "If you use System Restore when the computer is in safe mode, you cannot undo the restore operation. However, you can run System Restore again and choose a different restore point if one exists." I'm thinking that it might be a similar situation as it was done as part of the System Repair tool that ran when it failed to start up properly. –  Septih Feb 3 '10 at 9:29
    
I think my first sentence is the problem: you need a restore point, if that wasn't created it can't be done –  Ivo Flipse Feb 3 '10 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.