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If I have a compressed file that's stored as a self-extracting archive for Windows, i.e., a .exe file, is it possible to convert it to a zip file that can be unzipped under OS X? Alternatively, is there Mac program that can open one of these archives?

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I think that depends on how the file was created. Do you know that? –  bdecaf Jul 19 '12 at 13:06
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6 Answers 6

This is an old question, but I thought I'd throw this in anyway. With self extracting archives, you might be able to simply just run the sfx file and it should do it's thing. Make sure to give it executable permissions (chmod +x filename.sfx) and simply run that file in terminal (./filname.sfx) and it might just work.

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@Uri as I understand the question, it's about .EXE self-extracting archives (or SFX for short), not .SFX files. –  gronostaj Jun 12 '13 at 22:11
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@gronostaj yes the original question is specifically about EXE but I was looking for .SFX and found this question. This answer helped me; I don't think it should be chosen as the correct answer, but I also don't think it merits a negative score. –  Uri Jun 13 '13 at 13:31
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This may not exactly answer OP's question, but Google sent me here and this was the answer I needed, so I'm upvoting. –  RyanHennig Jun 23 '13 at 18:54
    
Ditto @RyanHennig -- I wanted to know how to open .sfx files on a Mac OSX system, and enabling executable mode on the file and running it from the terminal worked perfectly in my case. –  iX3 Oct 10 '13 at 15:43
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The Unarchiver supports this, and is an all round great extraction utility.

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The Unarchiver was able to handle multi-part, self-extracting archives for me. –  Andrew Hedges Jan 3 '13 at 21:56
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The freeware Keka is able to do that, too.

It first extracts a .zip file from the .exe file, which you have to open again with any zip-extracting tool that can handle password encrypted archives.

But if you just change the file extension from '.exe' to '.zip' you can skip the conversion and are asked for the password right away.

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The command line unzip in the terminal should be able to do it (it will report that it skips bytes at the beginning but should work fine otherwise).

List files:

unzip -v windowsfile.exe

Extract:

unzip windowsfile.exe 
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UnRarX handles this perfectly on OS X for me.

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I was unable to get unzip, The Unarchiver, nor Stuffit Expander to unpack an old self-extracting zip. I finally tried opening it in CrossOver Mac and it worked perfectly.

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