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When installing Windows 7 or Vista, does the language, version, architecture (64-bit or 32-bit) or source (OEM, retail, or MSDN) matter?

i want to purchase Windows 7 Ultimate for my newly-purchased(yesterday) Macbook(my interim programming development box).

as i intend to purchase Macbook Pro by year-end (my guesstimate when it already has Core i5), could i use the same installer on Macbook Pro by then (i'll uninstall Windows 7 Ultimate on current Macbook first)?

could the Macbook Pro received "this windows is pirated, you're a victim of counterfeit software". is what i'm intending to do is still in the boundary of Windows 7 Ultimate's license?

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marked as duplicate by nhinkle Jul 4 '11 at 6:33

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you buy a retail copy of Windows, you are allowed to use it on one computer at a time (assuming you do not purchase a family pack). You may change which computer you have it installed on at any time. If you move it onto your new computer, you are supposed to remove it from the first one.

After installing Windows, it checks online and activates itself with Microsoft. Unless the same CD key is used too often, they'll allow it to activate. If for some reason they don't, you can call Microsoft and they will either re-activate your key or provide you a new one at no charge.

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As long as you don't purchase an OEM version of Windows 7, then yes, you are fine.

You can have the full version installed on any PC as long as it's only on one PC at at ime.

OEM versions once installed, are tied to the machine. That's why OEM is cheaper.

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