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I often create a wireless ad-hoc network on my laptop running Windows 7. Now I'd like to connect to it using standard HTTP from my iPod Touch. I've tried 192.168.1.1 and that doesn't work. What should the address be so I can connect?

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Is your iPod on the ad hoc network? –  ceejayoz Feb 15 '10 at 17:21
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exact duplicate from same user: superuser.com/questions/109177/… –  quack quixote Feb 15 '10 at 17:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It could be that Windows is using APIPA, so you could try an IP in the range of 169.254.0.1 to 169.254.255.254 (169.254.0.0/16). That tends to be what (from my experience) Windows uses in ad-hoc networks.

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This is the closest anyone's got to a useful answer. The iPod touch is assigned an IP of something like 169.254.x.x every time... Running ipconfig on the host computer leaves a blank field for IP address, almost as if it's "hidden". –  Redandwhite Feb 17 '10 at 0:32
    
RedandWhite - In windows when a device is given a 169.254... address it usually means that there is a problem with the DHCP and the device is unable to pick up an IP address. This may not ring tru on an Apple though - just my tuppence. –  Joe Taylor Feb 18 '10 at 16:30
    
In reality, it doesn't mean that there is a "problem" with DHCP; it just means that it was unable to get an IP through DHCP and automatically assigns itself an IP in the 169.254.0.0/16 range. It's APIPA (Automatic Private IP Addressing) and it IS a standard that is supported, even on the iPod Touch/iPhone (and really, on most any networked device). –  squircle Feb 18 '10 at 23:14

The easiest thing you can do is go to the command prompt and type ipconfig.

Now, take a look at both your wireless's IP and subnet mask. You should see a section similar to this:

 Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.9
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

You want to take a look at the line IPv4 Address. In this example, the host is 192.168.0.9

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running "ipconfig" on an iPod Touch? interesting ... –  Molly7244 Feb 15 '10 at 18:21
    
@Molly I thought he asked what the host's ip is e.g. the Windows 7 machine? –  William Hilsum Feb 15 '10 at 18:52
    
but then he wouldn't see a default gateway, as the host IS the gateway in an ad-hoc network and the IPv4 address would be .1 –  Molly7244 Feb 15 '10 at 18:54
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@Molly, but I thought He wasn't asking what the default gateway is, he was asking what the host's IP was, and I guess you thought the same as you gave the host IP as well, I just said how to find it rather than what it (may) be. –  William Hilsum Feb 15 '10 at 19:02
    
quite so, but you wouldn't see a gateway on a controller setup as host for an ad-hoc network, IP (.1 by default) and subnet, that's it. –  Molly7244 Feb 15 '10 at 22:53

If running out of options, try to look at the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache: arp -a or arp -a -v for verbose mode.

Then match the MAC address with the interface you're after. You can get the list of MAC addresses on your machine with ipconfig /all.

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First make sure that your iPod is connected to the adHoc network. Second, the machines on your ad-hoc network will assign themselves IP addresses after checking to make sure that the address is not already in use. Therefore the IP address maybe different every time your create/connect to the ad-hoc network. To find out how to view your current IP address check out this webpage: http://www.groovypost.com/howto/microsoft/windows-7/find-your-local-ip-address-windows-7-cmd/

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The host IP address should be 192.168.0.1.

More information is at How to Set Up Ad Hoc Wireless Network in Windows Vista.

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On an Ipod touch there are three sections: DHCP,BootIP, Static Now in each section, there are fields and the main ones are: IP Address: Subnet Mask: Router: DNS: You can manually change the Static, if you know the ip address of your computer and router. Then statically assign your Ipod touch to an IP address that is free. The Subnet mask on a 192 address will be 255.255.255.0 as it is a class C network. The Router will be the ip address of your router (we think, if it doesn't work then change it to the pc) if you're router acts as your DNS provider then enter this as your DNS, –  Joe Taylor Feb 18 '10 at 16:36
    
source : pie.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055163628 edit: - you could use a free DNS provider but this may screw up your resolving of devices within your home network. Not having done it without a server running DNS I couldn't tell you. –  Joe Taylor Feb 18 '10 at 16:38

On an iPod Touch there are three sections: DHCP, BootIP, and Static Now in each section. There are several fields and the main ones are: IP Address:, Subnet Mask:, Router:, and DNS:. You can manually change the Static, if you know the IP address of your computer and router. Then statically assign your iPod Touch to an IP address that is free. The Subnet mask on a 192 address will be 255.255.255.0 as it is a class C network. The Router will be the IP address of your router (we think, if it doesn't work then change it to the PC). If your router acts as your DNS provider then enter this as your DNS.

Sourc : pie.boards.ie/vbulletin/… Edit: - you could use a free DNS provider, but this may screw up your resolving of devices within your home network. Not having done it without a server running DNS I couldn't tell you.

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