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My knowledge on the topic is rather limited, but does one have Kernel access/the general ability to change programs at run time whilst running Wine?


For Clarification: Can the user of the computer access any information they want via the Kernel on the underlying system running Wine, or does normal Windows security still apply?

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Ok, now that everyone seems to be uppercasing Wine: wiki.winehq.org/… –  Arjan Feb 26 '10 at 14:19
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Windows programs are encapsulated within Wine and can't access memory outside of the Wine-Process.

The FAQ of Wine actually answers this, how good is Wine at sandboxing Windows apps?

Wine does not sandbox in any way at all. When run under Wine, a Windows app can do anything your user can. Wine does not (and cannot) stop a Windows app directly making native syscalls, messing with your files, altering your startup scripts, or doing other nasty things.

You need to use AppArmor, SELinux or some type of virtual machine if you want to properly sandbox Windows apps.

That said, winetricks does have a sandbox verb that does at least a partial job of isolating Wine programs from the rest of your system. It protects against errors rather than malice. It's useful for, e.g., keeping games from saving their settings in random subdirectories of your home directory.

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Thanks, that link you posted answered my question! –  Kyle Rozendo Mar 8 '10 at 7:28
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Your question isn't quite clear; however WINE doesn't need any special privileges to run.

WINE compatibility varies largely from an application to another; the only sure way is to test it. For common applications, there are guidelines posted on the wine AppDB.

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I have clarified, thanks thus far. –  Kyle Rozendo Feb 26 '10 at 12:05
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Can the user of the computer access any information they want via the Kernel on the underlying system running Wine, or does normal Windows security still apply?

Well, Windows security applies to the extent that Wine emulates/implements it. So this depends on what exactly you mean by "Windows security".

What definitely will apply is the security of the underlying OS that you run wine on.

To the hosting OS, wine is just another application, and all restrictions WRT filesystem access, net access etc. apply. So a Windows EXE run in wine can do all the things a regular native program can. So if you want to restrict an app running in wine, the best thing is to run wine under a user account with limited privileges, or in a chroot (if the hosting OS has this).

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