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Do you think that a laptop consume less power when the color displayed on the screen is darker ? (And even less when the color is totally black) ?

I don't mean reducing the brightness or contrast settings but simply have a dark blue or dark green desktop (windows background color), and that parts of this desktop is visible (Grrr)

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up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, because the LCD backlight is always on, even if all the light (or most of it) is blocked by the pixels in front of it (thus displaying black).

The newer LED-lit LCD screens could eventually save some energy, but not the side-lit LED screens. Check this out: Difference Side-Lit LED versus Direct LED.

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+1: I was just going to say the same. –  SnOrfus Mar 3 '10 at 8:34
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You can save power by dimming the backlight (usually an Function + F# key combo) but you may want to still use a bright background color to keep the screen legible. –  Chris Nava Mar 3 '10 at 16:17
    
Especially on mobile phones with AMOLED or Super AMOLED displays may save upto ~25% of Battery life! –  math Jan 3 '12 at 16:12
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I use Black Google Mobile at http://bGoog.com to get a better battery life on my phone and to reduce my data usage. On OLED based screens you can use over 4x less power having a black background instead of white! The idea that black screens don't save anybody power is out of date and does not account for all the OLED based screens that are growing fast in popularity and now in use. There is more information on this at bGoog.com/about

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If you have any affiliation with this product, it is wanted that you mention this in your post and/or user info –  Ivo Flipse Aug 5 '10 at 10:41
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