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How can I move the pointer (the diagonal line) in a callout in Powerpoint?

I want the pointer at the textbox to point to the middle, not the upper third.

I would post a pic, but I don't have enough reputation, look here instead.

edit: I'm using PP 2003.

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2 Answers

Grab the yellow handles and move it. The yellow handles on shapes usually alter the geometry, eg the size and shape of an arrow head, or the radius of a rounded corner. Here it alters the position of the pointer line relative to the box.

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Nope. The far left yellow handle moves were the pointer points. The yellow handle closest to the textbox moves the textbox. –  masher Mar 10 '10 at 23:40
    
AH, now you tell us you're using 2003. The behaviour I described is what it does in 2007 and 2010, and yes, I confirm mine does the same as yours in 2003. Why not just draw a box and a line, and start the line from one of the anchor pioints on the box. When it goes red that means it is locking to that point. You end up with a box and line that move with each other, just like a callout. You can either draw an autoshape box (which means you don't have to use a rectangle), and use the right click > add text method to use it as a text box, or a text box and format it with a border, fill etc. HTH –  AdamV Mar 11 '10 at 11:11
    
Yep. Just did that, it's a bit annoying when moving the boxes, but once the layout is correct it does look much nicer. –  masher Mar 11 '10 at 22:53
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Sorry Matthew, on PowerPoint 2003 you can't modify where the callout line meets the text box. It's exactly as you state on your blog,

The left diamond moves where the pointer points, and the right diamond moves the entire textbox.

That's it, sorry.

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