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I created a partition on USB harddisk in windows and it reports to be an NTFS partition.

Yet in ubuntu 9.10 fdisk says it a FAT16 partition. If I mount with -t ntfs I see nothing, but if I mount without it I see all the files.

Can anyone tell me whats going on here?

Windows computer disk management definately says its NTFS, and a quick look at the raw data suggests it is NTFS, as I know the FAT16 very well.

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I created a partition on USB harddisk in windows and it reports to be an NTFS partition.

Yet in ubuntu 9.10 fdisk says it a FAT16 partition.

That does not really mean anything. fdisk can only read the partition label, which does not necessarily match the partition's file system.

If I mount with -t ntfs I see nothing, but if I mount without it I see all the files.

Well, then just look at the ouput of mount. It will tell you which filesystem Linux used to mount the fs (the "type..." part).

It is probably NTFS, maybe under a different name. E.g. the new in-kernel NTFS driver will show up as "type fuseblk", as it uses FUSE to implement NTFS.

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Yup -- sounds like the wrong partition type in the partition table to me. Upvoted. –  Alexander Burke Mar 16 '10 at 0:08
    
So it should be safe to use sfdisk to change it to whatever mount says it is? Looks like windows made an FAT16 partition type, but with an NTFS file system. (edit : just checked and it is fuseblk type, so it is NTFS) –  myforwik Mar 16 '10 at 0:21
    
@myforwik: In theory yes. But be very careful editing your partitions; if you make a mistake, you might lose all your data. Anyway, there's no reason to change the partition type. AFAIK it's not used by any software, it's just for display. –  sleske Mar 16 '10 at 9:34

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