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I have a system with Ubuntu 9.10 installed.

I can connect to remote windows shares by using the "connect to server" under "places" menu.

I can't figure out where these mount in the file system. Is it possible to mount it in the file system.

And I can't install smbfs or anything else. I need to use only what comes on the live CD, as there is no internet connection and no way to get in packages.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ubuntu's Gnome desktop uses GVFS to mount those shares.

You should be able to use the following command to mount your shares. If you have a persistent home directory, you can add this or similar to some startup files.

gvfs-mount smb://server-name/share-name

The mount should be available under your home directory, in /home/username/.gvfs. For example, on my system I did the following:

$ gvfs-mount smb://my-home-server/my-share
$ ls -F ~/.gvfs
my-share on my-home-server/

So that share is directly accessible (on commandline and in the desktop environment) via the mountpoint /home/username/.gvfs/my-share on my-home-server.

According to several sources, if you are using this over SSH or another situation where you aren't running the full Gnome setup, you may need to use dbus-launch to mount the share:

dbus-launch gvfs-mount smb://server-name/share-name

(source1, source2)

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if you want it mounted somewhere else, i believe this is possible, but you may have to modify a config file somewhere. alternately you can create a symlink to ~/.gvfs for easy access. –  quack quixote Mar 17 '10 at 8:08
    
I want to confirm that you need dbus-launch over ssh. Also the complete syntax for the Windows share should look like this: smb://DOMAIN\;username@server-name/share-name –  bjoernz Feb 26 '11 at 15:39

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