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Mac OS DVD Burning Software

This seemed way easier on my PC. I would just pop a blank dvd in the drive, it asked what I wanted to do with it, to which I would respond, "burn dvd with nero" (paraphrasing), then I would pick "new" and just drag and drop the folders in there.

Mac appears to have "Disk Utility" which just requires that I 'choose an image' but then doesn't bother to detail:

  • how to do this
  • what the options mean

For example, if I choose the format "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)" is that ever going to be readable on a non Mac machine?

I want to create an ISO standard DVD as per the 'default' you'd get on nero.

All the stuff on the web points to doing things with 'Terminal' (the whole point of buying a Mac was to get away from command line jiggery pokery - I'm trying to burn some photos not land a friggin lunar module here!)

Please, if you can just provide some simple instructions on what I need to achive this I'd be extremely grateful.

Edit:
I want to backup some files to a dvd, it appears I can do this with 'Disk Utility' with an image, but I don't understand how to create the image or indeed the implications of the different options that are available. (Why is there no help in the app?)

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Are the Parition and Image Format options not available in the "new blank image" dialog? –  Nerdling Mar 23 '10 at 15:24
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It's not a duplicate - I want to know how to use Disk Utility to create an ISO DVD. I don't want to know an alternative for Nero and I don't want to buy Toast (before I bought a mac folks kept telling me "It has all the software you need built in!") I want to know how to use the 'built in' facility to create a globally accepted standard DVD. p.s Burn sucks - blew up the first time I used it. :) –  adolf garlic Apr 3 '10 at 18:49
    
. After all my scouring of the net, it turns out it is as simple as this: 1.Shove blank dvd in side of mac 2.Right click folder containing files you want to preserve and select "burn dvd" 3.Lol 4.Cups of tea and medals all round! . –  adolf garlic Apr 15 '10 at 17:56
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marked as duplicate by quack quixote, random, Nifle, Ivo Flipse Mar 25 '10 at 17:20

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2 Answers

It is not quite clear to me: Do you want to create a DVD image or do you want to burn a DVD?
If the latter, try Burn.

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Burn will do both. Click the "Copy" tab, drag a DVD/CD to it then click "Save". –  moshen Mar 23 '10 at 14:56
    
@moshen: I meant an empty DVD image. –  Felix Mar 23 '10 at 15:18
    
Why downvote?--- –  Felix Mar 24 '10 at 19:28
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If you're just wanting to burn photos, you'll want to use the Finder (or alternative program like Burn or Toast) instead:

  1. Create a New Burn Folder (File -> New Burn Folder)
  2. "Copy" all the photos you want burned to that folder (it actually creates aliases)
  3. Press Burn

There's no .iso created it just creates the DVD.

If you're wanting to make a proper ISO from a set of files you don't even need to insert a DVD:

  1. Open Disk Utility
  2. From the File Menu choose New -> New Image From Folder...
  3. For format be sure to choose DVD/CD Master. The resulting file will end in .cdr that's OK.
  4. Save the image somewhere and then rename the extension from .cdr to .iso.
  5. If necessary use Disk Utility or another program to then burn said ISO to a disc.

On an unrelated bit, the "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)" format is also known as HFS+ and is not readable by other systems without extra software.

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the bit about 'journaled' is the type of thing that is very useful as I want it to be readable by anything i.e. ISO standard and not some no-doubt-more-efficient apple proprietary one –  adolf garlic Mar 23 '10 at 19:56
    
@adolf garlic: HFS+ is more of a disk-drive filesystem than a DVD-disc filesystem. standard ISOs use ISO9660 or UDF filesystems; i believe Apple has a proprietary disc filesystem as well (that may be what you get if you apply HFS+ to a DVD, i'm not sure). –  quack quixote Mar 23 '10 at 20:46
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