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I have a computer on LAN running ssh. I can normally tunnel the GUI application using

ssh computer-name -X program-name

But I wam my full desktop to be running on a remote computer using ssh so that I can just use that computer remotely like a local desktop. For this I think I will need to run KDM (or GDM ) remotely, what configuration do I need to do to make this happen?

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this question is very similar to others that have been asked; do the answers to superuser.com/questions/118985/… or superuser.com/questions/121809/… answer your question? – quack quixote Mar 27 '10 at 21:55
    
also see superuser.com/questions/70578/… in regards to what your ssh command is doing – quack quixote Mar 27 '10 at 23:46
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a howto for configuring XDMCP.

Or you can use something like OpenVNC or RealVNC.

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For accessing a full Linux desktop remotely, I'd suggest you take a look at NoMachine NX. You need a server program running on the remote machine, and then use a client to log in remotely, after which a new Gnome or KDE session is launched and it's almost exactly like using the machine locally.

Disclaimer: I haven't used NoMachine NX recently or followed its development. However, a few years ago I was totally impressed by its speed and smoothness. Running graphical X programs over network is often really slow, but with this tool it was much more tolerable. (I e.g. used it to access my work computer at a uni seminar presentation for a hands-on IntelliJ IDEA coding example.)

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Alternatively, look at FreeNX (freenx.berlios.de) for a free-as-in-GPL NX server. – Jonik Mar 29 '10 at 8:01

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