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How would I go about converting this bash script:

mkdir /store/sftp/%USERNAME%

sudo useradd -d /incoming %USERNAME%
sudo passwd %USERNAME%
## Password needs to be typed or passed in here
sudo usermod -g sftp %USERNAME%
sudo usermod -s /bin/false %USERNAME%

sudo chmod 755 /store/sftp/%USERNAME%
sudo chown root:root /store/sftp/%USERNAME%
sudo mkdir /store/sftp/%USERNAME%/incoming
sudo chown %USERNAME%:sftp /store/sftp/%USERNAME%/incoming

To accept a username and a password?

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1  
Please be aware that command line arguments can generally be seen by other users on the system. – coneslayer Apr 7 '10 at 15:45
    
True, but this is a closed environment where only an admin can get in, and all other users have been "jailed" away for SFTP purposes. – Urda Apr 7 '10 at 15:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, you should avoid that lots of sudo calls. Instead, you should run the script with sudo. The final version would look like this:

#!/bin/bash

# first check for root user
if [ ! $UID -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "This script must be run as root."
    exit 1
fi

# check if the user provided an argument
if [ -z $1 ]; then
    echo "No username provided. Usage: $0 username"
    exit 2
fi 

username=$1 # set the first argument as the username

mkdir "/store/sftp/$username"

useradd -d /incoming "$username"
passwd "$username"
## Password needs to be typed or passed in here
usermod -g sftp "$username"
usermod -s /bin/false "$username"

chmod 755 "/store/sftp/$username"
mkdir "/store/sftp/$username/incoming"
chown "$username:sftp" "/store/sftp/$username/incoming"

Quoting is necessary because the user name may contain spaces (but sure, it usually doesn't).

Edited to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Anyway to stop the script from running if no user is provided? – Urda Apr 7 '10 at 20:39
2  
if [ -z $1 ]; then echo "No username provided. Usage: $0 username"; exit 2; fi – Dennis Williamson Apr 7 '10 at 21:25
1  
echo "blah" >&2 to get extra points for proper stderr usage. – grawity Apr 8 '10 at 12:10

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