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  • I have purchased a DVD of Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6.2)
  • I purchased a Mac mini with Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5.7)
  • I tried to install Mac OS X 10.6.2
  • Everything went perfectly. System was installed successfully.
  • But the problem that I faced is as follows.

  • System was installed but my older data remained as it is. (means installation didn't format every thing - means installation was done on upgrade basis.)

  • Now, my system works with very low speed. Previous performance of Mac mini was double as compare to current upgrade version.

Now - my question are as follows.

  • Does an upgrade installation causes the performance issues in Mac OS X?
  • Or is Snow Leopard too demanding for the Mac mini? ( 2 Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo, 1GB RAM - is this configuration OK for Snow Leopard? )
  • Does a fresh install work better than an upgrade?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Snow Leopard by default will upgrade an installation. If you want a completely fresh installation you need to erase the disk by using Disk Utility from the Snow Leopard DVD (it's in the Utilities menu when started up off the DVD).

Upgrade Issues

Upgrade installations don't most often cause issues but many people recommend against them because of the amount of complexity they add when dealing with issues. Especially when dealing with non-stock software or software that installs in odd locations. In my experience upgrading 7 or 8 Macs it's been a near non-issue with the exception of one computer with a bad kernel extension that required an update before it was stable again.

So no, an upgrade installation is not likely to introduce performance issues on Mac OS X but it complicates how things may have been set up potentially making it harder to find out what the issue is.

Snow Leopard Too Demanding?

Snow Leopard isn't too demanding on the Mac mini you have listed, however the 1GB of memory you have installed is by far your biggest limiting factor when it comes to performance. If you aren't quitting programs then it's quite likely you're constantly swapping memory which is extremely slow. This is exacerbated in Snow Leopard versus Leopard because of possibly loading 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the libraries on Mac OS X. (Regardless of what kernel is used).

So no, Snow Leopard is not too demanding but you're definitely holding it back with only 1GB of RAM.

Fresh Install Better?

Normally yes - it means you have no possible cruft from a previous installation. There are many instances however where it would not make a difference - for example, a badly behaving application once installed on a fresh system will be just as bad as an upgrade.

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