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I blocked Firefox with Sunbelt Personal Firewall v.4.5 (formerly Kerio Firewall), by placing red X's on the four in/out points in the configuration. I noticed that the posted text messages on the Nascar Live Racecast on EPSN are still updating. I then blocked svchost.exe (out->Trusted), the only other thing enabled that's relevant, and the messages are still updating. (The only other thing allowed is completely unrelated, it's an independent application doing something else, and I don't want to kill that right now, or do a 'disable all traffic' in Sunbelt until it's done.)

Anybody heard of Sunbelt Firewall having such a huge, obvious hole? Is there something else that needs set?


UPDATE: I see the Firefox connections in "Overview" - they are all TCP connections to the standard port (HTTP), there are several. Blocking Firefox doesn't kill them, but it kills other pages loading, such as a different ESPN page, and it kills a loading Adobe flash movie. Those ESPN connections are not make if Firefox is blocked before loading that page. For some reason Sunbelt is failing to block those established connections.

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1 Answer 1

This is common, often firewall products will only block connections at the time they are being made. If you change the rules in the middle of a connection, it generally wont block existing connections. It does this in the name of efficiency...better to check a connection once at opening time, then at _every_single_packet_.

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Is there software available to stop all but currently allowed connections? That's what I need. –  Carl Apr 19 '10 at 19:54
    
@Jason: i suggest posting that in a separate question. you can link back to this post for reference. –  quack quixote Apr 19 '10 at 22:26
    
Posted separate question - superuser.com/questions/132950/… –  Carl Apr 20 '10 at 14:46
    
I re-read the answer - what does "then at every_single_packet" mean, how do you do that? –  Carl Apr 21 '10 at 13:52
    
@Jason: if you want to block firefox from using the internet...why not just close firefox? or close that particular page that's using the internet? Or you could try using "Offline Mode" (choose "Work Offline" under the "File" menu in firefox) –  davr Apr 21 '10 at 23:39

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