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I use /proc/pid/status on Linux to find out the memory usage and process status.

Is it possible to do the same thing on Windows?

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The Windows Task Manager can give you a lot of information - have you checked to see if it covers what you need?

If not Process Explorer (from SysInternals) may help.

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thank you will look into it and get back to you – Andy Apr 21 '10 at 11:35

If you want something CLI based, tasklist might help:

C:\>tasklist

Image Name                   PID Session Name     Session#    Mem Usage
========================= ====== ================ ======== ============
System Idle Process            0 Console                 0         28 K
System                         4 Console                 0        160 K
smss.exe                    1300 Console                 0        228 K
csrss.exe                   1348 Console                 0      4,064 K
winlogon.exe                1372 Console                 0      2,736 K
services.exe                1416 Console                 0      2,892 K
lsass.exe                   1428 Console                 0      5,956 K
svchost.exe                 1608 Console                 0      2,300 K
svchost.exe                 1716 Console                 0      2,152 K
svchost.exe                 1852 Console                 0     10,944 K
Smc.exe                     1992 Console                 0      8,544 K
svchost.exe                  200 Console                 0      1,792 K
svchost.exe                  364 Console                 0      1,840 K
ccSvcHst.exe                 544 Console                 0      2,920 K
spoolsv.exe                 1088 Console                 0      1,076 K
svchost.exe                 1672 Console                 0        764 K
ASFAgent.exe                1804 Console                 0      1,516 K
cvpnd.exe                   1908 Console                 0      5,532 K
DWRCS.EXE                   2000 Console                 0      1,200 K
IAANTmon.exe                 208 Console                 0      1,488 K
inetinfo.exe                 220 Console                 0      2,672 K
OcsService.exe               304 Console                 0      2,336 K
nmesrvc.exe                  952 Console                 0        328 K
isqlplussvc.exe              964 Console                 0        520 K
TNSLSNR.EXE                 1008 Console                 0      3,080 K
java.exe                    1020 Console                 0      7,360 K
oracle.exe                  1336 Console                 0     26,656 K
svchost.exe                 1592 Console                 0      1,776 K
Rtvscan.exe                  880 Console                 0      4,724 K
WDC.exe                     1104 Console                 0      2,036 K
cmd.exe                     2704 Console                 0        348 K
perl.exe                    2716 Console                 0      2,740 K
java.exe                    2924 Console                 0     23,116 K
emagent.exe                 2372 Console                 0      3,436 K
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yes this is more like it, – Andy Apr 22 '10 at 11:02

I know this is an old post but I was looking for the same thing and wanted to contribute the solution I found.

The windows management console seems to be similar to /proc Just open a command windows and run wmic /? to see all the options.

To get a process list do

wmic process list

You can also format it with an xsl stylesheet. Here is mine on pastebin http://pastebin.com/ZQkbudAQ Put this in the current directory.

Then run:

wmic process list /format:mystyle > process_list.xml

The "list" command is just a dump of all property/value sets for a command.

The "get" will retrieve specific properties. Use a comma separated list.

wmic process get CSName,ExecutablePath,ProcessId
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