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I'm running OneNote 2010 and wondering if there is a way to edit the default styles?

If you change the default font, the styles won't be changed. Is there any template, registry key or file that allows for the styles to modified?

styles in onenote 14

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Apparently, you can't. Also, Editing improvements section here says:

Gallery of basic Styles OneNote 2010 adds a quick gallery of basic note-taking styles, such as Heading 1, 2, 3. While not intended to match the complexity of a word processor's style gallery, these basic styles provide a quick and easy way to apply a consistent structure and appearance to recurring types of notes (for example, class or meeting notes).

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Yeah, the fact that styles can't be customized or re-ordered is annoying. However, it is actually possible to customize the "Normal" style's font characteristics.

Go to File, Options, General and then you can specify the font characteristics under Default font.

Also, you can apply the Normal style using the shortcut key Ctrl+Shift+N. I find this is useful for getting back to the regular style after using some special formatting.

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You can get an add-in that will allow you to customize the styles in Onenote. Haven't tried it myself but the comments indicate it works as stated.

Onetastic Custom Styles http://omeratay.com/onetastic/?i=update-for-onetastic-1-3-0#custom-styles

Onetastic Download http://omeratay.com/onetastic/?r=download

Versions available for Onenote 2010 32-bit and 64-bit

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wow, amazing find! –  jay Oct 3 '13 at 23:54
    
I have tried Onetastic and it does allow creating custom styles (pity that defining custom keyboard shortcuts to use them efficiently isn't there, perhaps in a future version.) It also only applies to new pages, and doesn't change existing ones. –  matt wilkie Oct 7 '13 at 20:26

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