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Is TeraCopy still useful in Windows 7?

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put on hold as primarily opinion-based by slhck Apr 12 at 8:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You might want to take a look at this thread. I've used tera copy on Windows 7 and yes, it does speed up transfering your files. I've used it to transfer files across a single disk and across a network, and in both ways it greatly speeds up the process.

Hope this helps some.

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Original Answer

Truthfully I haven't tried TeraCopy yet, but your question is interesting because I just found it a couple days ago while trying to delete a large amount of files on a remote server. So I can at least speak for the Win7 stock behavior:

Windows 7 file copy, move, and delete are absolutely not any faster than any other version of Windows I've used, including 2000, XP, Server2003, and Vista. I do this stuff a lot on the job and it's still torture in Win7, whether you use the GUI or the command line, excepting robocopy (which won't do deletes). Need to do multiple file operations on large sets of files at the same time? Say goodbye to your OS until next week... I usually do these operations on a remote workstation I have setup and let it do the big file operations on shares while I use my desktop workstation for real work.

Updated Answer

I have been using TeraCopy for quite awhile now (since my original answer to this question), and I've found that it significantly increases large copy operation speeds.

My main use has been on a corporate network domain. At the same moment, my boss and I, sitting side by side on windows 7 laptops, started to copy the same directory from an ntfs share. The directory contained ~3000 files and totaled ~3GB. I used teracopy, he used windows explorer, regular old windows 7 copy paste. My copy operation completed in approximately 1/10th of the amount of time it took for his. By this, I mean that at the time my teracopy operation completed, his explorer copy window showed about 10% completion.

I know that this is extremely unscientific, but this simple test and my direct experiences with using teracopy on a day-to-day basis have led me to believe that it is FAR faster than windows explorer's copy behavior.

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TeraCopy is not only a fast way of copying your files but a safe way as well. That's the primary reason I use it—I can count on it completing its job, or at least safely aborting, without damaging the file being moved or copied. The same can't be said of the still-unstable Windows shell, which just crashed on me yesterday, for example.

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Feel free to grab your question from the edit link (superuser.com/posts/308482/revisions) and repost it as a new question –  random Jul 10 '11 at 4:27
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Yes it is for special purposes. If you want to pause your copy and so on, its really useful. (However I just use Total Commander at those times. >.>)

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does it speed up copy paste process? i don't use pause though –  metal gear solid May 22 '10 at 14:57
    
yes it does in specific cases. Overall you can only win with it. (Personally I experienced some problem with it on a x86 win7 so I just uninstalled it soon.) –  Shiki May 22 '10 at 15:11
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