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I've researched a bit and came to the understanding that VirtualStore is part of the new UAC feature in Vista/W7 which is the file system part of the transparent data redirection and redirects write access to folders like program files to C:\User\<username>\AppData\Local\VirtualStore\ in lack of applications respecting the LUA principles.

Now I'm interested if that kind of transparent redirection can also be used as a power to the user. Here's an example which comes to my mind:

I install any kind of software to e.g. D:\Whatever\ThisAndThisApp\ and I set up things that, after initial installation, any write access to this folder is transparently redirected to e.g. D:\MyOwnVirtualStore\Whatever\ThisAndThisApp\file_only_writable_here.txt.

Is this thinking too far or can I actually use that power of VirtualStore as a user on Windows 7? I'm using the Professional version zf that matters.

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As far as I know you can't, and in any case the Virtual Store is hardwired to be the folder
C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\VirtualStore.

The only mechanism available to users are Symbolic links, which under Windows 7 are known as Hard Links and Junctions.

If that's something you would like to use, you will find the program Hard Link Magic to be useful.

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Symbolic links are soft lonks and are different to hard links. Windows 7 includes the mklink tool to handle links. Junctions are effectively symbolic links which point to a directory rather than a file. As mklink allows one to make symbolic links to a directory they seem rather pointless. – Neal May 30 '10 at 20:14
    
Accepting, as it seems what I'm asking for is currently not possible. – mark Jun 13 '10 at 22:58

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