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Is there any problem overclocking the Core i7 chip on an x58 mb with you have all 6 memory slots filled? I just heard somewhere that if you want to overclock you should stick to 3 modules? Is there any truth to this?

thanks,
Ncage

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The RAM will be overclocked as a side effect of raising the system bus, unless you lower the divider. The fewer the modules, the fewer the points of failure. This is why you want less physical modules, so that there is less of a chance it one will not be able to stand up to the increase.

This is also the reason that dual cores of the same general family can OC higher than their quad counterparts. You can only stably overclock a CPU to the highest speed that the weakest core can sustain. Half the cores = half the possible points of failure.

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thanks for the reply but most of what you said i already know. I currently have core quad & 3.8ghz that i have (2GBX4) = 8GB (all slots filled). I just want to make sure i'm not going backwards with my upgrade since i probably pretty quickly will go for 12GB. I was just wanting to know with Corei7/x58 generally how things were. I know quad cores in general are harder to overclock but it doesn't mean it can't do it. –  user9611 Jun 1 '10 at 4:07
    
@user9611 - I wasn't saying don't OC if you're using 6 modules, you won't be able to push them as high most likely. –  MDMarra Jun 1 '10 at 4:14
    
@user9611 - Another thing to consider: Are you actually using 8GB or do you just want more for bragging rights? If you're not using all 8GB, you'll get better performance by OCing the RAM than by adding more. Adding RAM to a system that doesn't use it doesn't gain you anything. –  MDMarra Jun 1 '10 at 4:19
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