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I'm looking for a desktop board that supports either VT-D (Intel) or IOMMU (AMD) technology. This is the IO virtualization technology, not VT-x for CPU virtualization. I've found a list of chipsets that are purported to have this, but every board I look at, the vendor has decided to not support that feature. I would really prefer a desktop board over a server board for this.

Does anyone have a specific model that is known to support this technology?

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closed as off topic by Simon Sheehan, 8088, DragonLord, Renan, Indrek Oct 11 '12 at 0:22

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look at http://wiki.xensource.com/xenwiki/VTdHowTo , consumer boards are hit and miss but server boards are always work. I would use the parts recommended here napp-it.org/napp-it/all-in-one/index_en.html. The Supermicro X8SIL-F is a good choice.

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My board has the feature. Never tried virtualization, so I cannot give you feedback on how it performs in practice, but I am absolutely sure you can enable it (just checked the user guide and yes it has a BIOS item for enabling VT-d). The board is the Asus P6X58D Premium, for LGA 1366 processors.

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There are currently 6 desktop boards that support VT-d listed by Intel:

http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-030922.htm

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Support of the board is not fully accurate information, VT-d is about CPU (beware of stepping C1), chipset (as Michal linked), BIOS (many times it depends on CMOS Setup choice), OS (in case of linux you should have proper kernel modules) and VM solution.

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