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I have a ubuntu machine that is not ideal to work directly on the machine as there is no monitor,mouse, keyboard usually connected to it. So I have VNC on it so I can remote access it from my desk. I have it set to auto log into my user so I can reconnect after a restart. But it comes up saying:

Enter password to unlock your login keyring

And I cannot VNC into it until I manually go over, hook up a keyboard, etc., enter my password.

Is there a way to set this up so I can remote access without having to go get on the machine and enter my password first?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rather than VNC, I highly recommend using the free NoMachine remote desktop system. It's more secure -- the connection is established via SSH authentication, with your username & password on the linux machine. It also removes the requirement for the server to auto-log-in -- it can just boot up to the login screen, and your NoMachine session happens in the background.

Download page is here -- you need to install the debs for "NX Free Edition For Linux" on the server (all three packages that it provides, in alphabetical order -- client, node, and then server package). And then you need to install "NX Client for Windows" on your windows machine.

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Instead of posting multiple answers, it's usually preferred to edit your existing answer. ("Edit" button just above the comments.) –  Roger Pate Jul 1 '10 at 12:33
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Is the computer connected via a wireless network? (I'm guessing 'yes' -- that would expalin the need to unlock your keyring, since wireless passwords are among the things stored in your user's login keyring.)

If so, one solution would be to connect the machine via wired ethernet, instead of wireless. Then, it'll be able to get on the network (and listen for VNC connections) without needing to unlock your login keyring.

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Actually the ubuntu machine and my windows machine that I am connecting from are connected to the network via Ethernet. –  JD Isaacks Jun 30 '10 at 20:40
    
Also I don't know if this is a clue or not, but the linux machine doesn't ask for the keyring "until" I try to connect via VNC. Then vnc doesn't do anything on my windows machine until the keyring is entered on the linux machine, then the vnc windows pops up. –  JD Isaacks Jun 30 '10 at 20:43
    
Do you have the Remote Desktop session password-protected? ("Require the user to enter this password" in Ubuntu's Remote Desktop Preferences) If so, I imagine that password would be stored in the login keyring, and that would explain why it needs to be unlocked. Does it "fix" the problem if you remove password protection in Remote Desktop settings? –  dholbert Jun 30 '10 at 21:48
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You should not put yourself into the risk of being hacked by sending your login/password in clear text over your network. Or using login services like this terminal login.

Please use SSH instead.

Just install the package ssh-server on your server and install a ssh-client software in your windows computer

Then you can use ssh to log in securly into your server, without the risk of someone sniffing your login/password or someone do Man in the middle attack on you. You are supposed to be able to run different services, like remote desktop tunneling through ssh. That is the secure way of doing remote login.

putty is supposed to be a good ssh client for MS Windows.

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/

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I am not sure if you have seen this before, but GNOME has a document describing how to use PAM to unlock keyrings upon login.

You would just have to configure the machine once, and then your autologin should unlock the keyring by itself every time.

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