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After upgrade to Opera 10.60 on my Gentoo Linux it stopped reading fonts.conf all of a sudden and now I am not happy with how Arial bold looks in non-Latin letters. Particularly bold cyrillic "м" letter looks almost as black square when Arial is used. I want to tell opera not to use Arial at all, there are plenty of replacements: Liberation fonts, Droid, etc. I found stylesheets, but not sure how to write statement which prescribes not to use Arial in web pages. I know that there is "not" selector in CSS v3, but could not make a valid statement out of it. Anyone mastered negative statements in CSS?

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Should be moved to SuperUser. –  mbq Jul 4 '10 at 10:11
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@mbq: agreed (voted to migrate to SU) –  David Thomas Jul 4 '10 at 10:15
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CSS is considered programming-related. –  ChrisW Jul 4 '10 at 10:16
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@ChrisW, but this question seems specifically related to a problem in a piece of software rather than an issue with css in general. –  David Thomas Jul 4 '10 at 10:23
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@ricebowl Whatever his motive for asking the question, the object is programming-related: I think that developers are more likely than superusers to be able to answer a question about writing a CSS rule. –  ChrisW Jul 4 '10 at 10:39

2 Answers 2

Just symlink Arial to Liberation Sans in your filesystem.

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To bad you can't do this just for opera though –  nhutto Jan 4 '12 at 23:17

I think you should be able to use Opera's config options:

opera:config#UserPrefs|LocalCSSFile

to define a style rule. While my approach isn't a negative statement it should achieve the same result:

@font-face {
font-family: "Arial";
src: url(path/to/replacement/font.ttf); /* or local(path/to/replacement/font.ttf); */
}

I'm not sure if there's a way to force Opera to use your user.css file for Arial fonts, or not, but it might work. And it's the best I could think of at the time...good luck! =)


Edited following comments:

This seems reasonable but it did not work. May be it has to be used with some element definitions. - temujin.ya.ru

and the response, from ChrisW:

@temujin.ya.ru See whether it works when used with a stylesheet that specifies Arial explicitly. If so then the problem is with stylesheets that specify Arial implicitly, e.g. by specifying "sans-serif". Also I wonder whether there are other/similar font names e.g. "Arial Cyr", "Arial Cyrillic", etc. – ChrisW

If the problem is related to implied fonts (font-family: sans-serif; for example) then the above could be added to, with the following:

@font-face {
font-family: "sans-serif";
src: url(path/to/replacement/font.ttf); /* or local(path/to/replacement/font.ttf); */
}

But this approach would become unwieldy very, very quickly.

An alternative, and possibly better, approach is:

[in Opera] Tools > Preferences > Advanced > Content > Style Options > Presentation Modes

And configure the options available there, which allows you to specify whether pages render under 'author' (author of the web-site) or 'user' (your own) css modes. You can limit this to 'page fonts and colours,' or 'My fonts and colours.'

Though I'm not sure how good, or bad, this alternative might be.

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This seems reasonable but it did not work. May be it has to be used with some element definitions. –  Anonymous Jul 4 '10 at 12:57
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@temujin.ya.ru See whether it works when used with a stylesheet that specifies Arial explicitly. If so then the problem is with stylesheets that specify Arial implicitly, e.g. by specifying "sans-serif". Also I wonder whether there are other/similar font names e.g. "Arial Cyr", "Arial Cyrillic", etc. –  ChrisW Jul 4 '10 at 13:07

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