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Is the value of default gateway & DHCP server the same for client computer?

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closed as not a real question by Diogo, afrazier, Breakthrough, Canadian Luke, Randolph West Aug 11 '12 at 3:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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You will have to give more details on what you are trying to do, because for now, it's really hard to understand what you are talking about. Also, please avoid unnecessary capital letters. –  Gnoupi Aug 3 '10 at 21:19

2 Answers 2

On a DHCP client machine, DHCP is not a value (IP), you define if it has to be used or not. If yes, the machine will receive all network config from the DHCP server. If not, you'll have to define the values (IP, default gateway and DNS) manually for the machine (fixed IP).

If you are on a DHCP server (in DHCP configuration), DHCP server is not a parameter you can configure, it's the IP of the server.

Default gateway is the IP of the router used to reach networks out of yours like Internet or a different sub network. If you use DHCP, the client will receive this value from the server. If not, you have to configure it (with at least DNS) manually on all machines.

On all machines of the same subnet the default gateway should be the same (in normal conditions) and the DHCP server also. If the DHCP server is the router (usually the case in small networks), the default gateway's IP is the IP of the DHCP server (but because the server is the router not because of DHCP).

And reforcing Gnoupi's comment, more details would be easier to get an answer!

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It doesn't have to be, no.

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