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Is it virtually impossible to prevent keyboard Hijacking either at home or even at work? I mean you can't block anyone from hijacking your keystrokes at work or home or both correct? If there are network sniffers at work, then you're pretty much screwed as far as the fact that those can probably get past anything and monitor anything as well as your network admin has full control of active directory and various permission sets applied to each individual's PC if using Server 2003 correct?

I just was always curious about this.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Even if there is no malicious software installed, it's always possible to install a hardware key-logger inside or attached to your keyboard. Although nowadays, it's arguably even easier; lots of people use radio keyboards and mice, and with the right equipment, someone would be able to monitor the channel (unless it's encrypted, which I doubt - at least for the cheapest ones!). But by the time this is a concern for you, you might be concerned about the possibility of a camera being installed somewhere near your keyboard or screen, too.

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Well, Bluetooth is pretty secure (unless they sniff the initial pairing!) –  Shinrai Aug 10 '10 at 16:18
    
@Shinrai: Not if the logger is inside the keyboard. Meaning they took it apart and are logging before it transmits. –  Josh K Aug 10 '10 at 16:37
    
lol thanks. I wouldn't doubt cameras at some places but I don't think they'd be putting them in keyboards or whatever for fear that employees would stumble across them uncovering a whole slew of outrage. –  user23511 Aug 10 '10 at 20:00
    
Is there any way to tell that I'm being logged? I know that's prob an impossible question to ask without asking my admin but maybe there's a way to "listen" somehow when I type to see if that's the case? –  user23511 Aug 10 '10 at 20:01
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@Shinrai: With physical access, all bets are off. There was a great article a year or so back about people loading up a TrueCrypt volume (everything's in RAM, safe right?) and freezing the RAM chips with some freon immediately after pulling power thereby preserving the contents long enough to duplicate it. Freaky stuff can be done when you can get your hands on it. –  Josh K Aug 11 '10 at 17:47
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