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I had 3 computers on a network and my friend decided to download something. All of a sudden, no one was able to access the internet and resolve any host until after he finished his download. What happened? And is there a way to stop that from happening? That was the first time, but I suspect it may not be the last. I am using a 2wire router.

Update He was downloading something from MediaFire, I believe. It was not Bit Torrent for sure. It was a direct download. It started happening a while after he started the download, but as soon as his download was finished, we were all back able to connect to the internet like instantly.

Update It seems it has happened again. This time, I was just one YouTube streaming 1080p. No one was able to make new connections, as in they could not visit a website or connect to AIM, etc... Do you think ISP is tampering with connection? I am not a heavy downloader, but I have downloaded before without any problems such as this.

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3 Answers 3

It may be a bandwidth problem, your friend may have used all of the available bandwidth, so your packets took some much time that your app timed out. It may be also caused by an exhaustion of available sockets on your router, but I don't think that a bittorrent client uses many sockets, if he used a bittorrent client (4 or 5 I guess).

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Well, you provided us with little information, but if your friend used bittorrent, he may have overloaded your router. As a result, it may be unresponsive to other computers untill data transfer finishes.

To help us help you, please tell us what was being downloaded, which program was being used over which protocol, did the problems start immediately after start of download or several seconds later or several minutes later. After end of download, how much time did it take for normal connectivity to be restored. Which operating systems are computers using and are addresses assigned by DHCP server in router or some other way. Is router mirroring DNS servers or are clients connecting directly to DNS servers outside of your network?

If you don't know what something on this list means, or can't provide information, tell us. We may be able to help you get needed info.

EDIT

This is interesting. I've never heard of such problems before when using direct download. It could be that Luc Stepniewski got it with bandwidth, but usually web hosting sites such as MediaFire limit download speeds. Try downloading something from M$, they usually have very fast servers and see if the problem happens again. For example try this. If you get problems again, check if your router has quality of service settings and see if it is possible to decrease priority of downloads.

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I will update my post. –  Doug Aug 17 '10 at 1:54

Are you connected via WLAN / WiFi? How fast is your Network? How fast is your connection to the internet?

Maybe your friend just used all the bandwidth that is available?

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