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When I write a shell script and compile it, I generally load Linux/Knoppix (Unix) in my Windows based PC. This is arduous and I am really tired of loading the entire OS each and every time.

Is there a quicker method than this?

I want to fire up a Unix editor, write up the shell script and have it run or interpreted without the slow process of booting up another operating system every time I want to do this.

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Shell scripts are rarely compiled. Which shell are you using and how are you compiling the scripts. What are you doing with them afterwards? You need a place to run them, right? –  Dennis Williamson Aug 25 '10 at 6:08
    
@Dennis Williamson ya i am running with "Sh hello_script.sh" command..so basically i need an environment for running the shell-script, if such available on web then pls suggest me –  Paresh Mayani Aug 25 '10 at 6:37
    
@PareshMayani running your script it is interpreted, not compiled. Interpreted means each line is converted to machine code and then run. A compiled file is binary, cat an executable(output it to the screen / open it in an editor), contrast that to catting a script. Compiled files are files of binary code. –  barlop May 22 '12 at 20:35
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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You should be able to do all your scripting in cygwin which is a Linux-like environment for Windows.

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You might try ideone.com. You can edit and run bash scripts there (like Dennis commented, shell scripts a hardly ever actually compiled). Input is limited to stdin and output is limited to stdout, so you could not use it to develop any file manipulation scripts. If you are just trying to avoid the dual-boot/reboot situation there is no need to look for an “online” solution though.

Dan’s recommendation of Cygwin seems like a reasonable way to run shell scripts under Windows.

If you need something a bit more fully Unix-y you might try a virtual machine (run another OS “inside” Windows). I think you can use VMWare Player to run a variety of pre-installed GNU/Linux distributions.

Along the same lines, you could try VirualBox and install your preferred Unix-y system under it if you can not find a suitable VM image that is compatible with (or you prefer not to use) VMWare Player.

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ya i heard about VMWare Workstation but dont have a idea about installing GNU/Linux inside that VMWAre player –  Paresh Mayani Aug 25 '10 at 7:59
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+1 For VirtualBox –  Johan Aug 25 '10 at 8:25
    
In both VMare and VirtualBox it's easy to have a .iso cdimage and tell them to use it as a "cd". Then you start the virtual machine and the installation starts just as it would on a normal PC. –  Johan Aug 25 '10 at 8:27
    
your answer is also very much helpful but i cant accept more than one answer.so please execuse Thank you –  Paresh Mayani Aug 27 '10 at 6:44
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There are any number of free shell accounts available on the web. You would probably access them via ssh rather than a browser. This site is one list of some of them.

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This came to mind as well, sometimes I find myself SSHed into my desktop right next to me to do some CLI things. –  Nathan Adams Aug 25 '10 at 15:40
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  1. Check out ׂGnu on Windows. You may find it less of a hassle then Cygwin.
  2. Perhaps you are really looking for a free shell account. Personally I got an account at devio.us. You will need an ssh client such as PuTTY to access it.
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To get really creative, you could load up an Ubuntu distro on an Amazon S3 cloud, and basically set yourself up with an ubuntu-based server for free.

EDIT Chris in the comments has made the correct statement. It's not S3 that allows for the Ubuntu installation, but rather the EC2 service. And though not 100% free, it is relatively inexpensive for light use, but most likely not worth it. Thanks Chris for clarifying!

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Don’t you mean EC2 instead of S3? EC2 may be a reasonably inexpensive when you only use a few hours every once in a while, but it is not free. –  Chris Johnsen Aug 25 '10 at 6:58
    
Ya i am already loading up "Knoppix" version of Unix/Linux from the bootable CD..basically i need the solution for the my TuToring Class..Thanx –  Paresh Mayani Aug 26 '10 at 4:11
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