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Can anyone recommend from experience a desktop card (PCI/USB) wireless N card that works well with Ubuntu and supports 5 GHZ? Ideally it would work right out of the box, but I could compile modules if needed.

I am thinking of getting a E3000 router for this as well and slapping DD-WRT on it.

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closed as off-topic by Journeyman Geek Jul 4 '14 at 11:44

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1  
possible duplicate of Certain Wireless N Cards in Ubuntu –  Sathya Aug 28 '10 at 14:29
    
@Sathya: That doesn't really address the 5 GHZ requirement. –  Kyle Brandt Aug 28 '10 at 17:31

1 Answer 1

Two days ago I moved to my new office and I found that 2.4 GHz channels are totally jammed. I cannot even open a single web page. The 5 GHz channels are rather good (my phone connects to them).

My laptop ThinkPad X240s with Intel Wiress-N 7260. The wireless card does not support 5 GHz band. But there is a dual-band version of it: Intel Wireless-AC 7260.

A little research reveals that iwlwifi driver since Linux 3.13 supports 7260. So I bought the dual-band version and replaced my old wireless card with it.

It works nice and smooth. (I am using kernel 3.15.2)

$ sudo iw phy phy0 info
[...]
    Band 1:
[...]
        Frequencies:
            * 2412 MHz [1] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2417 MHz [2] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2422 MHz [3] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2427 MHz [4] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2432 MHz [5] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2437 MHz [6] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2442 MHz [7] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2447 MHz [8] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2452 MHz [9] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2457 MHz [10] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2462 MHz [11] (16.0 dBm)
            * 2467 MHz [12] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
            * 2472 MHz [13] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
    Band 2:
[...]
        VHT Capabilities (0x038071a0):
            Max MPDU length: 3895
            Supported Channel Width: neither 160 nor 80+80
            short GI (80 MHz)
            TX STBC
            SU Beamformee
        VHT RX MCS set:
            1 streams: MCS 0-9
            2 streams: MCS 0-9
            3 streams: not supported
            4 streams: not supported
            5 streams: not supported
            6 streams: not supported
            7 streams: not supported
            8 streams: not supported
        VHT RX highest supported: 0 Mbps
        VHT TX MCS set:
            1 streams: MCS 0-9
            2 streams: MCS 0-9
            3 streams: not supported
            4 streams: not supported
            5 streams: not supported
            6 streams: not supported
            7 streams: not supported
            8 streams: not supported
        VHT TX highest supported: 0 Mbps
[...]
        Frequencies:
            * 5180 MHz [36] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
            * 5200 MHz [40] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
            * 5220 MHz [44] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
            * 5240 MHz [48] (16.0 dBm) (no IR)
[...]

You can see it has two bands, one for 2.4 GHz channels and one for 5 GHz channels. It has also "VHT capabilities", which means it supports 802.11ac.

Go get it, you'll never regret it.

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