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Do you know where can I find all commands like dig, mount, grep, cat, etc. All those built-into bash and Ubuntu Linux?

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If you counted the thousands of "commands" many users have written for themselves, the list would go out of date quickly. If you ignored them, your list would be incomplete. If you only considered your own machine, you would miss many not-yet-installed programs (things such as dig or mutt don't come pre-installed). –  grawity Sep 12 '10 at 18:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Linux commands for bash http://oreilly.com/linux/command-directory/

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Do be careful with this, however. I'm running linux, and there many many items on this list that I don't have installed. –  frabjous Sep 13 '10 at 20:30

I appear to be interpreting your question differently from the other posters; I feel like you're trying to get a comprehensive list of programs that can be run from the shell.

I'm going to start by saying, the bash built-in commands can be found through the bash help system. This is distinct from the programs shipped with ubuntu like sed, awk, grep, etc.

Having said that, this list is almost certainly going to be useless, because of the sheer volume of commands (hundreds and hundreds and hundreds).

And THAT being said, there are a few ways to do this. You can do an ls in every directory in the PATH (usually /bin, /sbin, /usr/bin, /usr/sbin, /usr/local/bin and /usr/local/sbin is a fairly complete set of commands).

Or, at the bash prompt, you could just hit TAB a few times, and a list of all of the programs on your machine located in your PATH will scroll down; press q to escape out of that scrolling list. This is nice, because it will auto-complete any name you start to type (for example, typing mk TAB TAB TAB will bring up a list of all commands in your PATH that start with mk.

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+1 You wrote aproximatly what I was writing –  Nifle Sep 12 '10 at 15:21
 % man <name_of_command>

or

 % info <name_of_command>
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man bash

will show you the bash's manual, where you'll find a list of all the bash commands too.

All the other commands (not just the command line ones, though, KDE/Gnome GUI programs are there too) usually are in /usr/bin, though you'll find some more in /usr/sbin or /usr/local/bin. To know what they do,

man command_name

so for example

man find

If you're looking for a specific command you can use apropos. It will help you find the program you need based on what it does. For example if you need a program to convert audio, try:

apropos audio

You'll get a list of all the man entries that have something to do with audio and are installed on your system.

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If you really want to burn them into your brain, try this as your wallpaper:

alt text

(Click to zoom in)

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