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Is there some way to track down why a machine is unreachable ?

I have got various machines ... some real, some virtual

Just created a new virtual Server 2008 R2, running in VMware Workstation, and I'm finding it can't access the administrative shares on the host machine, which is a Win7 machine ... actually it can't even ping the host!

Another weird thing is ping knows the target machines IP, but it reporting "destination host unreachable"

However the virtual can ping and access administrative shares on various other machines ...

  • another real Win7 box

  • a few virtual Win2003 boxes running on the host

Any idea how to get at the shares, and ... even better ... I've seen similar before, how can I work out what is the cause

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Another symptom ... the virtual machines can access the machine when I'm at work on the domain, but return home and again can't access it ... is this something relating to the fact that at home the network is set to "Home network" and the Win7 machine is member of the Home Group ? – SteveC Sep 23 '10 at 16:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See the article Destination Host Unreachable - Reason and solution.

It explains the possible reasons for the error and advices:

  1. Make sure that local host is configured correctly
  2. Make sure Destination Computer/Device is up
  3. Disable the Firewall and check for the issue.
  4. Perform a tracert to the destination IP and check where the problem lies

It also supplies several useful links.

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Believe the host is fine and up, disabled firewall with no apparent effect, tracert also says destination unreachable ... but the weird thing since I disabled/re-enable firewall is my other real Win7 machine can access the d$ administrative share after authenticating ! – SteveC Sep 17 '10 at 8:47
Is it possible that some other firewall still blocks access? – harrymc Sep 17 '10 at 9:15

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