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How can I select non-contiguous files on a Mac? On Windows I would use Ctrl + click, but Finder considers this to be a right click.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use ⌘-click (command-click). Most shortcuts in Windows that use CTRL use ⌘ in OS X.

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The command/Apple/flower key does pretty much the same thing in MacOS that the Ctrl key does in Windows.
Also, Google is your friend: http://www.google.com/search?q=mac+os+select+multiple+files
For details, see this tech support cheatsheet.

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Why the down vote? At least leave a comment. –  Xavierjazz Sep 14 '10 at 15:58
    
Two downvotes and counting. :( Still, my original answer wasn't really an answer, so I added one. I was really just looking for an excuse to post that XKCD cartoon. Is there a humour tag? But I'm always a little surprised when people post questions with such easily-found answers. Maybe this is for meta, but do we want to replace Google as the first stop for computer questions? –  boot13 Sep 14 '10 at 16:06
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Don't necessarily want to replace Google and you're right that this is an easy question, but I know that if I search a computer question at Google and get a link to Superuser, I'll probably get a nicely curated answer rather than an endless thread on a forum with a dubious solution. Again, not necessarily relevant for this question. –  fideli Sep 14 '10 at 19:27
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Google links are looked down upon. –  Sathya Sep 14 '10 at 23:02
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Google links are looked down upon. Also, your "answer" doesn't answer the question. Such stuff is meant for the comment box ( although again Google links are likely to be flagged and removed as spam). If I ahd seen the original answer I'd have downvoted too. –  Sathya Sep 14 '10 at 23:07

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