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I recently installed Fedora 13 and receive this Boot message:

iptables: Applying firewall rules: iptables-restore: line 14 failed

I am new to Linux and need help in figuring out how to fix this.

EDIT: Here is the output of rules.

  Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination         
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED 
ACCEPT     icmp --  anywhere             anywhere            
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            state NEW tcp dpt:https 
ACCEPT     tcp  --  anywhere             anywhere            state NEW tcp dpt:SSH 
REJECT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination         
REJECT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere            reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination     
share|improve this question
    
Your iptables rules would help, considering we have no idea what line 14 of your rules is. The output of iptables -L should do it. –  MDMarra Sep 15 '10 at 2:41
    
It doesn't look like your iptables is really doing anything at all. All chains are set to accept and the only thing being rejected is superseded by a rule allowing it. Though this isn't going to fix your issue, why are you even using iptables if it's just allowing everything anyway? –  MDMarra Sep 15 '10 at 11:07
    
I didn't know I was. I have no idea what I'm doing. I am trying to figure this all out. Fedora has that little message box on the top of my screen and I figured something failed was bad. What is iptables? –  winarm Sep 15 '10 at 17:22
    
iptables is the kernel packet filter, basically it's used as a firewall/traffic shaper/connecton limiter/traffic forwarder. The most common use is as a firewall. If you're not using it as a firewall, you should be able to safely ignore it. –  MDMarra Sep 15 '10 at 22:13
    
Very good. Thank you kindly. –  winarm Sep 16 '10 at 4:15

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