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Whats the difference between the Intel Dual-Core(brand name) processor and the Core 2 Duo? It seems like clock speed is the only difference, but I want to make sure that is the case. It seems like anything over 2.6GHz is Core 2 Duo, and anything under 2.6GHz gets the label Dual-Core.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_Dual-Core

The Intel Dual Core is its own product line of Intel processors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core_2

The Intel Core 2 is also another product line of Intel processors.

The pentium dual-core processor is a one of Intel's value or basic processors available. That is why you save so much going with that processor. The Core 2 is the more powerful desktop processor from Intel, hence why you pay more for it.

Here is a review comparing performance between the two: (This is well put together)

http://expertester.wordpress.com/2008/05/30/core-2-duo-vs-pentium-dual-core/

And a forum discussion about the differences:

http://www.devhardware.com/forums/intel-processors-30/pentium-dual-core-vs-core-2-duo-188459.html

I assume you mean the difference like on this inspiron 537 between the two middle models:

http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/desktop-inspiron_537s?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

If you notice next to the processor names is the intel e5200 and the intel e7500. These are the processor numbers you can look up on the internet for futher specifications and reviews.

The E5200 is listed under the Pentium Processor for Desktop on intel's website:

http://processorfinder.intel.com/List.aspx?ParentRadio=All&ProcFam=2841&SearchKey=

The E7500 is listed under the Core 2 Duo Desktop Processor

http://processorfinder.intel.com/List.aspx?ParentRadio=All&ProcFam=2558&SearchKey=E7500

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The processor review page is a little old, but it gives a good perspective on the differences. –  Troggy Aug 6 '09 at 17:39

Dual core refers to a processor that contains two separate processing cores. Core 2 Duo is a brand name of a processor which is also in a dual core configuration. This is the short answer. The brand name and the descriptive name match up precisely in this one case.

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This answer would indicate that it's just about naming, but other answers indicate that there are performance differences as well, with Core 2 Duo being the faster/better/more expensive one. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Nov 12 '09 at 7:45

The Core 2 Duo has two cores inside a single physical package. The Core 2 Quad has four cores in its package. In applications that utilize multithreading, such as Photoshop or video editing, you will see a tremendous improvement over a Core 2 Duo at the same clock speed. In single-threaded applications, there will be less of an improvement.

from http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_an_Intel_Core_2_Duo_and_an_Intel_Core_2_Quad

And

dual core is 2 cpu in a package

2 cpu's in a die = 2 cpu's made together 2 cpu's in package = 2 cpu's on small board or linked in some way

core 2 duo = brand name of certain kind of cpu like pentium or amd atholon

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1  
He asked about Core 2 Duo and Dual-Core, not about Core 2 Quad. –  ianix Aug 6 '09 at 15:57
    
Sorry its mistake ;) –  joe Aug 6 '09 at 16:00
    
If I got to Dell, I can get and Intel Dual-Core, Intel Core 2 Duo and Intel Core 2 Quad. I have the Core 2 Quad at work, which is great, but I don't need it at home. I can save big money going with the Intel Dual-Core, I'd just like to know if its the same architecture and the Core 2 Duo. –  WindyCityEagle Aug 6 '09 at 16:04
    
I believe he is asking about the two intel processor products and why one is cheaper then the other. –  Troggy Aug 6 '09 at 16:23
    
is it the question like that ? –  joe Aug 6 '09 at 16:25

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