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I just installed the latest security update on Mac OS X (installed on 2-10-2010). On restart my Mac booted in Windows 7, which I had installed previously and was set not to boot by default.

I tried to restart holding the alt key, and selected the Mac OS X partition, but still the Windows 7 partition boots. It does not matter what partition I choose, Windows 7 always boots.

I took a look in the OS X partition and noticed that the admin home folder is empty, or at least Windows is not showing any files there. There is another user on OS X and I can see their files no problem.

This has me stumped, has anyone any suggestions for a finding a solution?

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When you say "admin", you mean your primary user account with administration privileges? Do you use FileVault? –  Daniel Beck Oct 5 '10 at 11:41
    
Yes my primary user account. And no I don't use file fault. Although all my important stuff is backed up :) –  Brian Heylin Oct 5 '10 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

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Try starting up with the 'X' key held down. This should cause your Mac to boot from the first Mac OS X partition it finds, regardless of start up disk setting.

If that won't work, it would suggest that your installation has had a problem with the update. Boot from your install DVD and use Disk Utility to verify your disk, repair permissions etc. If that won't work, you may need to re-install the system. IIRC there's still an option to install just the OS and leave all your users and Applications alone.

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The boot menu sorted itself out when I booted using the install disc. In the installation app I opened the Startup Disk app and told it to restart in OSX. This fixed the problem. –  Brian Heylin Oct 5 '10 at 17:56

I suggest download and install rEFIt it maybe solve your problem.

rEFIt is a boot menu and maintenance toolkit for EFI-based machines like the Intel Macs. You can use it to boot multiple operating systems easily, including triple-boot setups with Boot Camp. It also provides an easy way to enter and explore the EFI pre-boot environment.

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