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Can virtual machines infect their host?
Virtual Machine and Virus

Is the host OS isolated in terms of security? If I don't secure my VM could my Host OS be at risk? If it is secure then running windows in a VM on Linux may be the safest way to run Windows!

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marked as duplicate by Sathya, random Oct 22 '10 at 22:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

In theory it is possible if there is a vulnerability in the virtual machine. In practice, there's no need to worry as long as you keep the networking locked down -- don't let the guest have access to your internal network except the specific route needed to get to the internet.

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Vitalization is very much like sandboxing, it keeps the guest file system completely separate from the host, however, if you set it up as if they are peers on a network with any sharing privileges, then one can be infected by the other as if they were both normal machines on a network. – MaQleod Oct 22 '10 at 19:09
    
so if I have a shared folder setup between the guest and host, that could be a potential target? – ioSamurai Oct 22 '10 at 20:36
    
@Shogun: Unlikely but possible – Daenyth Oct 22 '10 at 20:44

Yes, it has been demonstrated. See also this answer. Although I'd agree that it is not very common yet.

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