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I'm wondering how can I hide a partition from a pc and still be able to run software installed into that partition, I followed the steps of this question's first answer but I can't access any data from the hidden partition.

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As you still want to access it (rather than keeping it as a backup like in the question you linked), does it still need to be hidden while you're using it? (If not, then something like a TrueCrypt hidden volume might help.) –  Arjan Oct 30 '10 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

If all you want to do is hide the drive letter, you could mount the partition under a path. For example, if you don't want your temp files to fragment you system drive, you can make a "temp" partition and mount it under C:\temp. Then everything written to C:\temp will actually be written to the other partition.

Unless you know where the partition is mounted you (through windows) wouldn't easily be able to find it unless you know about these things.

I wouldn't really call this hidden.

For a real hidden partition you could make an encrypted volume with TrueCrypt and then make a hidden volume within that. http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/hidden-volume

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mount it under C:\temp -- can one do that in Windows? –  Arjan Oct 30 '10 at 18:29
    
@Arjan mounting a partition to a path is in the same location where you change the partition's drive letter. Disk Manager, right click over the partition, click Change Drive Letter and Paths..., then you can add/remove drive letters or paths. I used to do this for my temp files, but it should work for elefai's backup files. –  Scott McClenning Oct 30 '10 at 18:37
    
I'm not on Windows but always thought it uses those drive letters. Nice! –  Arjan Oct 30 '10 at 19:32
    
Thanks Scott, I try that and update this question later, thanks again. –  eiefai Oct 30 '10 at 21:42

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