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I have a block of static IP addresses (eg. 211.11.111.n / n+1 / ...), how can i set them up. Or at least one of them, I need one to be pointing at a server.

More specifically, in my network connected to the router there are 3 Desktops (counting the server), my laptop, a wired printer and a NAS. Preferably I would prefer if the network stayed the same but the server could be accessed from outside of the network.

Am using Linksys WAG160Nv2, I also have a netgear DG834G. Advise on either is well appreciated.


UPDATE

When i talk about about a block of IP adresses i mean like 211.11.202.n / n+1 / n+2 / ....

Additionally the internet I use is ADSL with encapsulation PPPoA.

As MaQleod answered;

You can set up your router with 1-1 NAT and essentially NAT a single public IP directly to a single private IP for each device you want public. This will allow you to have your devices networked and will allow them to be firewalled.

The above is what am trying to find out how to do with the routers i have, preferably the Linksys one.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, for small business the Internet provider usually gives you a router that is already set up as necessary. The only thing you need to do is set up your server with one of the IPs and plug it into the router and you should be all set.

If that's not the case, you would have to make a 1-1 NAT for your servers. You can do that by going into the Setup > 2 Routing and setting up static routes, for example. Looking at the docs, you might try to select Internet Connection Type > Bridged Mode Only, which will make it a bridge.

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You can have 10 statics on a DSL line and still need to supply your own modem and router. Just because it is labeled as small business doesn't mean it needs a router normally or that the ISP will supply one. –  MaQleod Nov 14 '10 at 18:50
    
I have updated the question buddy, hopefully now is a bit clearer. Thanks for helping out –  Carlos Nov 14 '10 at 19:11
    
I don't have the experience with the model you have, but try the bridged mode. MaQleod explained it well what that means - basically, all your servers will be open (no firewall), i.e. your Linksys will basically function as a switch. This is the fastest thing to try, but you need to consider security after you do this. –  icyrock.com Nov 14 '10 at 19:15

By block, do you mean routed block or do you just mean a number of single IPs? What type of a connection do you have (ie routed or bridged)? Depending on what is coming out to you will depend on how you set up your network with those IPs.

If you have a bridged connection, it means that all the IPs are not in a block and you most likely have a Cable or ADSL connection. If this is the case, you need to request that your IPs remain static from our ISP and you have two options:

  • You can set up a switch and have all your devices plugged into the switch with static IPs set. They will not be networked together and they will not be firewalled.
  • You can set up your router with 1-1 NAT and essentially NAT a single public IP directly to a single private IP for each device you want public. This will allow you to have your devices networked and will allow them to be firewalled.

If you have a routed connection it means that you most likely have a T1 or EoC line, or less likely an SDSL or IDSL line, and you have a CIDR block of IPs. This means that you need a router capable of handling routed blocks for that specific type of technology. If this is the case, then you have one basic option and that is to set an interface on your router to have the routed block on. You then must use a switch and plug all devices into the switch. You can have the router DHCP out the public IPs or statically assign them, or both, and depending on your router, you can have NAT as well, or just add a device that will NAT a second network.

The first step is really finding out what type of connection you have and how those IPs are set up, otherwise you can't do anything.

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Excellent answer. I have updated the question maybe now is a bit clearer. Thanks again –  Carlos Nov 14 '10 at 19:09

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