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Suppose I have a telephone line with DSL at point A, and a computer at point B. A and B are in the woods, and about 200' apart. How should I connect them?

I'm excluding burying wires, as B is somewhat temporary and mobile.

Options I've considered:

  1. DSL Modem + Wi-Fi Access Point at A. Wireless through the woods.

  2. DSL Modem at A. Run ethernet through the woods to B.

  3. Run telephone line from A to B. DSL Modem at B.

Our climate consists of a looooong, damp, mild winter and a short, dry, mild summer.

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Go with Wi-Fi, my son. 802.11b should have the distance, though the speed is lacking. – user3463 Nov 16 '10 at 3:47
    
Hardly through the woods you can use wifi. What about ethernet over power lines? – titus Nov 16 '10 at 4:06

Wi-fi with directional antennas.

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1  
Assuming you have LOS – Joe Taylor Nov 16 '10 at 15:48

For 200' look at a pre-made fiber pair (fairly armored) and some fiber-Ethernet converters,.

will eat 200' for breakfast, and your Ethernet won't care.

I'm suggesting fiber because 60M is a fairly long Ethernet run.

There is wifi-like equipment 5.4Ghz which might work a lot better than 2.4GHz, as the 2.4GHz hates moisture and humidity .

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If you are a 'home-brew' kinda guy, try the 'Can'tenna: http://www.mikestechblog.com/joomla/networking-section/wifi-wireless-category/58-extend-wireless-wifi-network-building-24-ghz-cantenna.html

http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/wlg/448

Which give extra directional gain over wifi.

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For 200' you can easily use a wireless bridge, most commercial AP's support this. We use these to bring internet to our loading yard 1/2 mile away from our MDF.

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