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What tools out there can I use to determine network performance between 2 machines.

I have a Windows 2008 service on gigabit and a Windows 7 machine on wireless n and I want to test the performance.

I try to do a file copy over the air and I only seem to peak out at 4 MB/s.

I have 802.11N it says connected at 144mbits and I have WPA2 enabled. This seems quite slow for an N wireless connection.

Also the router is configured for 2.4 GHz and pure N only.

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1  
That sounds about right. 4MB/s is 32Mbps, which is consistent with my experience on Wireless N. Running electrons through a cable will beat out the wireless anytime, because the bits have a channel to run through. – user3463 Nov 19 '10 at 4:34
    
That makes no sense. I'm connected at 144Mbps and one line is connected at 1 Gbps! – Jeremy Edwards Nov 19 '10 at 23:11

Suggest you try IOMeter. It can be a difficult thing to figure out what test you want to run, but it does give lots of test cases.

Its free and you can find it here.

I have never had a good experience with wireless - be that N or otherwise.

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We meet again. I like IOMeter, but OP can also try NetMeter from hootech.com. – user3463 Nov 19 '10 at 4:36

You may want to read through the DD-WRT wiki on configuring wireless N for optimal performance: http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless-N_Configuration. Some of the options might not be in your particular router, but the principle is still the same.

A good start would be, if your router and clients support 5GHz, switch to it. 2.4GHz is too heavily used.

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Check out IPerf. It's typically used under *nix, but there is a windows port too - http://linhost.info/2010/02/iperf-on-windows/.

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