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In Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2, there is a new Resource Monitor that is very useful and powerful to monitor the system.

In the Memory section, I see a section called Modified (orange)

The official description is: Memory whose contents must be to disk before it can be used for another purpose.

But I am still confused. What kinds of memory is Modified? In which case can we say that this number of memory is Modified? Can anyone give me a specific example?

Is the following guess correct?

When a program want to write something into disk, it actually write the content to an IO buffer, which is in the memory. After OS flush this area of memory into disk, the memory is modified or standby?

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Is there anything else about what I have stated that you need cleared up? Maybe it's time to mark the question answered? –  Everett Nov 22 '10 at 9:11
    
Can you please answer my second question? Is IO buffer belong to modified memory or standby memory? –  performanceuser Nov 22 '10 at 19:15
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1 Answer 1

Modified memory is memory that was allocated by an application and then removed from the application's working set. This usually occurs because it hasn't been used for a long time. The only reason why these pages are kept on the modified list indefinitely is because the system doesn't have any available pagefile space left. If you increase the size of the pagefile the system will write most of these pages to disk and then move them from the modified list to the standby list. Standby pages are considered part of "available memory", because they can be reused for some other purpose if necessary.

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Thank you for you explain. Can you please answer my second question? Is IO buffer belong to modified memory or standby memory? –  performanceuser Nov 22 '10 at 19:15
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