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WPA is vulnerable to deauth attacks. But what about WEP?

I know WEP has a whole bunch of other issues... But right now, my issue is staying connected.

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Are you sure you didn't confuse WEP with WPA on vulnerabilities? –  Benjamin Bannier Nov 30 '10 at 19:57
    
@honk, no. PSK in WPA and WPA2 is targeted with de-authentication. The question is: does WEP suffer this as well? –  Arjan Nov 30 '10 at 19:59
    
As an aside, as WEP is easier to hack into: if, when using WEP, you are no longer suffering the deauth attacks, then that might actually imply that someone succeeded in accessing your network? (And hence has no need for sending the deauth requests any longer...?) –  Arjan Dec 1 '10 at 17:10
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2 Answers 2

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Neither WPA nor WEP encrypts management frames, so deathentication attacks are trivial under both standards. The 802.11w standard protects management frames, but is far from universally implemented: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11w-2009

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You are confusing WEP and WPA. WEP is the one that is most vulnerably to deauths, and a whole assortment of other attacks.

WPA is way better, but still somewhat vulnerable to deauths.

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yeah, under the right conditions, WEP can be cracked in < 1 minute. –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 30 '10 at 20:05
    
but with WPA, deauth attacks disconnect the clients, so that when they reconnect, the attacker can collect handshake data. So my question is if WEP has some vulnerability, similar to WPA, in which an attacker can deauthenticate clients from the router. –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 30 '10 at 20:06
    
@Der, note the "edit" link underneath your question! ;-) –  Arjan Nov 30 '10 at 20:08
    
from my experience it it much easier to deauth WEP than it is for WPA –  madmaze Nov 30 '10 at 20:14
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deauth, here means that clients are disconnected. Like.. I know that wep is suer easy to hack. @madmaze, is that what you mean? or does that mean that someone could forge a deauth packet, and have the clients disconnect from the router? –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 30 '10 at 21:55
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