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Is it possible to partition a hard drive in two and use one partition for Time Machine and the other for other uses? I am running Mac OS X 10.6.5 if it makes any difference.

EDIT: For clarification for future references: I am wishing to do this with an external hard drive.

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I assume you already know this but this servely limits time machine's potential as a backup utility. – JamesHenare Dec 2 '10 at 4:14
    
@Jaips: And why is that? – Wuffers Dec 2 '10 at 13:40
    
@Mr. Man: I'm under the assumption that you'll be partitioning an external drive for this purpose. Jaips might be under the assumption that you're interested in partitioning your internal drive. – fideli Dec 2 '10 at 14:04
    
@fideli: Yes, I am partitioning an external. Thanks. – Wuffers Dec 2 '10 at 14:20
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You can also use the TM partition for data. TM puts backups in the folder Backups.backupdb. Ignore it and you're good. Only drawback of mixed use I have experienced: Deleting backups to get temporarily more disk space for storage is much easier when you can just delete a partition. – Daniel Beck Dec 6 '10 at 22:27
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, that is absolutely possible. Use Disk Utility, make the two partitions, and use the Mac OS X Extended (Journaled) filesystem for the partition you wish to use for Time Machine.

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Just to clarify, just Mac OS X Extended for the Time Machine partition? And not Mac OS X Extended (Journaled)? – Wuffers Dec 1 '10 at 22:18
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Sorry, I meant Journaled. Basically, some people like to use FAT32 as the filesystem for external drives and that won't work for Time Machine. – fideli Dec 1 '10 at 22:36
    
Ok, Thanks! I really appreciate it! – Wuffers Dec 1 '10 at 22:53

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