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Best program to visualize file system usage on Windows?

My Windows partition has 46+GB space and all I have is 5GB left. I'm pretty sure I don't have around 40GB worth of personal files, so was wondering where those used space are coming from.

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marked as duplicate by Arjan, Mehper C. Palavuzlar, ChrisF, Ivo Flipse Dec 7 '10 at 15:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Just a heads up - most of these utilities don't work right in Windows Vista and later, in that they fail to correctly handle the hardlinks in your WinSXS directory and end up counting that space twice or more. You'll see this HUGE folder and want to clean it up, but there's really no data there at all. –  Joel Coehoorn Dec 7 '10 at 15:24
    
Strange @Joel, I never seem to have this problem on Windows 7 –  Ivo Flipse Dec 7 '10 at 15:30

4 Answers 4

I love http://www.jgoodies.com/freeware/jdiskreport/

It's written in Java and can be downloaded and installed or launched via Web Start.

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DirectoryAnalyzer is a good one too, quite simple.

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WinDirStat is awesome. The treemap view visualises your disk usage in an very effective (and pretty!) way.

"WinDirStat is a disk usage statistics viewer and cleanup tool for Microsoft Windows.

On start up, it reads the whole directory tree once and then presents it in three useful views:

  • The directory list, which resembles the tree view of the Windows Explorer but is sorted by file/subtree size,
  • The treemap, which shows the whole contents of the directory tree straight away,
  • The extension list, which serves as a legend and shows statistics about the file types.

The treemap represents each file as a colored rectangle, the area of which is proportional to the file's size. The rectangles are arranged in such a way, that directories again make up rectangles, which contain all their files and subdirectories. So their area is proportional to the size of the subtrees. The color of a rectangle indicates the type of the file, as shown in the extension list. The cushion shading additionally brings out the directory structure. "

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Tree Size from Jam Software works quite nicely.

TreeSize Free can be started from the context menu of a folder or drive and shows you the size of this folder, including its subfolders. You can expand this folder in Explorer-like style and you will see the size of every subfolder.

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