Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm thinking about getting a bluetooth headset to use primarily as computer microphone. Question is: do they typically have good quality compared to traditional wireless microphones (or classic wired mics)? Are they good enough for speech recognition software? I don't need top quality, just something decent.

Also: can the battery hold a 2-hour recording session?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have a Plantronics Calisto B70 Bluetooth headset that came with Dragon Naturally Speaking (Amazon.com: Dragon NaturallySpeaking Premium 11 Bluetooth).

If I try using sound recorder, I can hear some crackling noise as well as my voice, so I don't think the quality is great.

One time, I was able to get it working 99% accurately with DNS, but since then I haven't been able to repeat that accuracy.

The headset is worse in Windows Speech Recognition, perhaps because it isn't tuned for Bluetooth like DNS is.

For what it's worth, I tried doing a sound recording using a couple other pairs of analog wired headphones, and there was noise present on those too, so I'm thinking wired USB headphones would be the best, but can't confirm that.

UPDATE

I just bought the Plantronics 625 USB headset.

Training Dragon Naturally Speaking seems to be working better than with the B70 Bluetooth.

I also tried recording my voice as a way to compare them. The B70 sounds OK, but has a small amount of hiss in the background and has a lower range of frequencies. The 625 sounds much clearer and more natural.

Here's the recordings if you'd like to compare for yourself.

You could also have a look at the Dragon Naturally Speaking Hardware Compatibility List.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to thank you properly, so: thank you! Amazing answer! And the difference between USB and BT is abysmal... –  Mauricio Scheffer Mar 8 '12 at 23:42

They won't have as good quality as normal mics since the audio data is compressed before transmission. They are, however, generally good enough for speech recognition. Two hours might be a bit too long for the cheaper ones, but it certainly is doable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.