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After a few months of use (since the last reinstall of Windows XP) my parents' computer's start menu has become typically disordered. The obvious solution to this is to right-click and then 'sort by name.'

Unfortunately, when trying this, the context-menu flashes up and then disappears (so fast as for the flash to be barely noticeable). I'm assuming that, somewhere along the line, a right-click handler's become screwed up somehow, but for the life of me I can't think how. I've used a few online virus scans (Trend Micro's HouseCall, Bitdefender and Panda Security's 'ActiveScan'), along with AVG installed to their machine to try and rule out malicious software (all scans coming up negative).

Are there any obvious culprits I should look at? Or registry settings that can be removed/amended/deleted to enable right-click to work as normal?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rebooting normally takes care of this problem.

If not, try : Start, Control Panel, Taskbar and Start Menu, Start Menu, Customize, check Enable dragging and dropping, OK, OK.

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Well rebooting didn't work, which wasn't a huge surprise; but 'enable dragging and dropping' brought the context-menu back, though I have no idea why. Still; it worked! So please accept my acceptance and a +1 =) –  David Thomas Dec 19 '10 at 17:49

It is probably a context menu hook thats gone missing, try disabling the entries you don't use with the free utility http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/shexview.html it will probably fix your issue. If you get confused try only disabling entries from unknown sources, (office's, and windows media player stay)

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