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You get a CR-48 in the mail. You want to use it but the wireless network only allows access to specified MAC addresses. How do you determine the MAC address?

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Since you have access to the network configuration (to allow your new device), turn off MAC filtering for a minute, connect, and sift through the list of connected devices, get the MAC, add it to the list of allowed devices, and re-enable filtering. – Daniel Beck Dec 21 '10 at 20:41

Type:

chrome:///system

Look for 'ifconfig' and select expand. You'll see 'wlan0'. 'HWaddr' is the MAC address.

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Looks like this may or may not work if you're disconnected: code.google.com/p/chromium-os/issues/detail?id=10032 – Shinrai Dec 21 '10 at 20:42
    
Good catch Shinrai. – ngen Dec 21 '10 at 20:45

In what is probably a more recent development since you originally asked this question, you can see the MAC from the settings pop-up in the lower right corner. Click the clock, then on "Connected to [SSID]". In the lowest right-hand corner of that popup is an "i" button that looks like a stop sign with the hover text "Network Info". Clicking on it reveals the IP and MAC.

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Since ChromeOS 33 (possibly earlier) you go to chrome://settings, click the Advanced Settings link at the bottom, then click through Network Proxy Settings to bring up the dialog box. The MAC address is in there, possibly behind a tab.

This link is not Chrome OS specific but the general process is similar.

On my Samsung ARM Chromebook (1st gen) I can click the little Wi-Fi icon in the corner, select the network I'm currently on, and then click the "network" tab, which takes me to the same place.

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