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"A disk read error occurred" appears on screen after choosing to boot into Windows XP from GRUB.

[root@localhost linux]# fdisk -lu

Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders, total 312581808 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x48424841

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1              63   204214271   102107104+   7  HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2       204214272   255606783    25696256   af  HFS / HFS+
Partition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda3       255606784   276488191    10440704    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
Partition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda4       276490179   312576704    18043263    5  Extended
/dev/sda5   *   276490240   286709759     5109760   83  Linux
/dev/sda6       286712118   310488254    11888068+   b  W95 FAT32
/dev/sda7       310488318   312576704     1044193+  82  Linux swap / Solaris

Here, sda is a 160GB hard disk with quite a few partitions and 3 OSes installed. I am able to boot into Linux and Mac OS fine, but not into Windows anymore. The Windows system is located on /dev/sda1.

I cannot recall how exactly have I used testdisk but it once said:

Disk /dev/sda - 160 GB / 149 GiB - CHS 19458 255 63 
The harddisk (160 GB / 149 GiB) seems too small! (< 169 GB / 157 GiB)  
Check the harddisk size: HD jumper settings, BIOS detection...

So far I have tried to "fixboot" and "chkdsk" from a recovery console on the affected windows partition (/dev/sda1), the plug off power cord for 15 seconds trick, reinstalling GRUB, repairing the MFT and boot sector of the affected partition via testdisk, what next please?

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migrated from serverfault.com Dec 25 '10 at 13:14

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