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I want to format a disk into to 2 disks in Windows7, is there a software like pqmagic to do that?

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2 Answers 2

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Do you mean create a 2nd partition? You can use Disk Management in W7 to shrink the existing partition, then use the space you created to make another partition.

http://www.windows7news.com/2009/09/23/how-to-create-a-partition-in-windows-7/

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Things to know Before you shrink the partition, this article applies to W7 also.

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/working-around-windows-vistas-shrink-volume-inadequacy-problems/

If you need a 3rd party tool to do it, this one is good, I recommend making the Easeus boot CD after you install this software, and before you change any of the partitions.

http://download.cnet.com/Easeus-Partition-Master-Home-Edition/3000-2248_4-10863346.html

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Acronis Disk Director is a very good utility for doing this sort of thing (its a commercial product, though). –  martineau Dec 31 '10 at 17:55

It sounds like you want to "partition" your hard-"disk" into two or more "disks" rather than keep your entire hard "disk" visible as one complete drive. Typically, Windows is set up to use one physical "disk" drive and then use that entire physical drive as one logical drive too. In other words, Windows typically allocates the entire drive as the C: drive. But if you want to add another permanent partition and create an E: drive for example, then you will likely need to shrink your C: partition in order to make room which can be quite dangerous to your Windows partition particularly if you don't know what you're doing - although I can say that defragging would be the first step. This is something that you almost must do if you want to dual-boot between 2 or more operating systems. Although, you can use a nifty little Linux thing called Wubi if you don't like living on the wild side like that, but I digress...

Then again, maybe you simply want to just add a new virtual "disk" ("VHD") or two. Virtual disks look and act exactly like different hard disks complete with drive letters and everything, but they are really just giant files. VHD's must always be mounted if you want to get to the files and folders in them, but they are great for sharing information between virtual operating systems, doing system backups (assuming you copy them somewhere else when done), and even for saving sensitive information that can be easily encrypted (since we're really talking about one file). And creating a VHD is no where near as dangerous as messing with real partitions too. The only problem with VHD's is that only Windows 7/Vista/XP can easily see and deal with them in a real environment. Maybe there's a Linux or OSX utility that can deal with VHD's, I just don't know of them is all.

In either case, if you want to manipulate your hard drives real "partitions" which can be very dangerous or make new virtual disk drives which is a much safer alternative, here's how to get to the Windows 7/Vista utility that will eventually let you do either one: Right-click on "Computer" (possibly "MY Computer" if you use another flavor of Windows), select "Manage" and then look for "Disk Management" in the left. There are only 3 categories in "Computer Management" that can be expanded (and likely already are expanded) - System Tools, Storage, Services and Applications. What you want is in the section under "Storage" called "Disk Management." From there, you can do all kinds of things with "disks" either for real (and dangerously) or virtually.

I can go on with how to make a virtual disk (VHD) as well as how to mount one (which you will need to know) but I'm not sure if I haven't already taken a serious detour from what you have asked. It's hard to tell exactly what you want to do since the term "disk" can mean a whole bunch of other things that I haven't even touched on. In any case, I hope this little bit helps.

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